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Well-loved socks

One year later . . .

These were the socks I knit for my sister for Christmas in 2006. She sent them to me when I sent her another pair this past Christmas. She told me she loved them and provided proof:

One year later . . .
.

And this is the Wollmeise Brombeere that I had left over when I knit her these socks:

Wollmeise Brombeere - leftovers

I'm thinking I have enough for my first attempt at mending socks. Tips anyone? Ideas?

This will be a short post for now, but I wanted to thank those of you who left such helpful and encouraging comments (and sent private emails) in my last post. I am pursuing some leads you all have given me and have discovered that a native Japanese speaker will actually have a more difficult time translating to English in an understandable way. He/she can translate in the SPOKEN native Japanese language, but then I would have to have somebody translate THAT. That explains the difficulty that my uncle had providing me with a translation. I had to set aside the pursuit in favor of some unexpected crises this past week, but it remains at the top of my mind -- even though I haven't been able to sit and reply to the emails some of you have left. Please know it is very much appreciated.

For those of you new to my blog, this is my maternal grandfather:

Grandfather
Born April 1891, Kyushu - Died January 1939, Tokyo

and this is my grandmother:

grandmotherblog.jpg
Born June 1898, Kyoto - Died June 1959, Tokyo

The samurai ancestry is on my Grandfather's side.

Comments

Two words of advice:

Darning Egg.

I know nothing about repairing socks, but I do know that Carolyn Medlin has darning eggs.

As usual, I love the photos, but you know how I love, love, love old pictures. I am thinking about starting to post some on my blog. I have so many, but I don't if anyone would be interested besides me.

I have problems wearing socks I make for just that reason!

I hope you are successful in your ancestoral pursuit. I think it is fascinating.

I'm not an experienced darner, so... :) Google should provide some good info, because I've seen tutorials but can't remember where. My SIL turns her worn out handknit socks into hand puppets for my niece! :)

Your grandfather was so handsome! Wow! And Grandma was so cute!

Sending you good vibes!!!

can't help with sock darning tips. your grandmother looks like such an amazing woman!

Wow...your lineage is sure interesting and intriguing at the same time!

Socks: I'd check out sock groups on Ravelry. I'm sure there are some master sock menders out there.

Grandfather: wow, look into his eyes. He has a very calm powerful presence.

Grandmother: look at the light and laughter in her eyes. Bet she was fun to know.

Years ago I watched my grandmother darn socks using a darning egg, but I'm afraid I don't know how to do it. I have heard that collecting hand-turned darning eggs can be addictive.

What wonderful photos! You are very lucky to have them.

Doesn't Wollmeise have the most generous yardage? You could probably just knit another pair and pretend that you had mended them!:)

I have not yet tried darning socks so best of luck with that!

I repaired a sock heel just today. I used the Twisted Sisters' guide. Essentially what you are doing is knitting an "afterthought" heel, with the additional step of first picking up stitches before the original heel and then unraveling, or cutting out, the damaged heel. You can then knit a wedge heel (think toe), a center decrease toe or a short row heel which you then kitchener to the foot of the sock.

Look online for afterthought heels and I am sure you can figure it out from there.

Good luck.

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