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Arm warmers

Toast Arm Warmers by Leslie Friend

While Erica was here over the holidays, I started and finished these useful Toast arm warmers. Because our late-December temperatures fluctuated wildly -- sunny and warm one day, chilly and gray the next -- I needed a little something to carry with me to keep me warm (and even accidentally wore them to bed one night). They were perfect.

Kim had generously gifted me with one skein each of the same Classic Elite Portland Tweed that Leslie used to knit her Toast and Toasty mitts. They're both lovely neutrals with spots of unexpected color. It was such a smooth and speedy knit -- there's a tiny bit of viscose in the fiber that gives it slightly more elasticity.

Classic Elite Portland Tweed from Kim - Chronic Ennui
Classic Elite Portland Tweed in Black Forest and Folkestone

In the last couple of weeks, I've received some long-awaited copies of my Japanese family "koseki." Koseki are family registries that show births, deaths, marriages and more. I received the koseki for both my grandmother's and grandfather's families. The translations gave me some valuable information along with official names and dates to enter on my family tree.

Japanese Family Registry - Koseki

I learned that my grandfather and his siblings were raised by their uncle (Toshiyuki) after their father (Motomichi) died. I learned that my grandmother's father was adopted and that his birth name was "Gohee Noda." This is enough information that I can now request koseki for my great-grandfathers and great-uncle. I'm grateful to Mr. Eric N for his translation help -- I learned from Lisa that older koseki are very difficult to translate, so I'm appreciative of Eric's help in translating the older ones.

Comments

That's very cool - I love learning about your ancestry with you!

I have to second Elizabeth. This is very cool. I'm so glad you were able to find someone to translate for you.

the paper alone that the koseki was printed on looks like a piece of art. What wonderful information to have on your family.

I am so glad that you could find someone that could translate the older koseki. You are well on your way to unfolding the mystery of your japanese heritage.

having that information must be so fulfilling!

i love that you slept in your toast. :)

how exciting that you have the koseki and someone to help you translate!
beautiful toast.

It is fascinating to learn about the process of unravelling your past.

Oh, and I love the Toast, that tweedy yarn is gorgeous.

I am amazed at the patience and tenacity you exhibit in finding your roots. It's really so fascinating!

I've been curious about that Portland Tweed...can't wait to see your Toasties:)

What gorgeous yarn!

I love that you can find so much about your geneology. It is really interesting!

That is excellent news for your family info hunt. I've always thought Japanese symbols were so beautiful. Sorta like hearing a foreign language spoken that you do not know. I listen to the sound and it can be musical. The Japanese symbols are elegant art forms to me. I can only understand the shapes not the meanings of what has been written.

Oh, loved the yarn too!

How fascinating to be getting this kind of information and finding that it takes you further into your search for your family's history.

Ive been reading all the posts you have made about all you have done to get information about your ancestors, I really wish I could do the same, in my country things are not organized and even asking my mom, my dad (when he was alive), aunts, uncles and other relatives about our ancestors is difficult because they don't remember things and there's very little pictures or documents for anybody, when I ask them to send me things they say they will but forget about them.

Even when I get frustrated sometimes I'm still determined to gather that information! reading your posts keep my hopes on finding that information alive.

Ive been reading all the posts you have made about all you have done to get information about your ancestors, I really wish I could do the same, in my country things are not organized and even asking my mom, my dad (when he was alive), aunts, uncles and other relatives about our ancestors is difficult because they don't remember things and there's very little pictures or documents for anybody, when I ask them to send me things they say they will but forget about them.

Even when I get frustrated sometimes I'm still determined to gather that information! reading your posts keep my hopes on finding that information alive.

What beautiful tweed yarns! I've fallen asleep at night wearing mitts before.

I'm glad you found someone to help translate the Koseki for you. It must be fun to learn the names of your ancestors and where they are from.

Found this site while looking for another. This one actually has better info.

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